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ENVIRONMENT

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PAUL HESSBURG: WASHINGTON'S FORESTS - EAST OF THE CASCADES...FIGHTING FIRE WITH FIRE

Jim Petersen -

If we choose wisely, relying on the mechanical thinning, prescribed fire and managed fire, we can still protect most of our remaining forest assets, including the soil and water. But over much of the Intermountain West, the forests in our future are not going to look much like the forests we've been enjoying for the last 60 or 70 years.

JIM DORAN REVISITED: WASHINGTON'S NATIONAL FORESTS - EAST OF THE CASCADES...BRING A SOLUTION

Jim Petersen -

There is something unethical about allowing a person or a group that refused to participate in the collaborative planning of the project to file an appeal on the project.  The essence of collaboration means that you work through the issues within a project and help solve the problems.  Bring a solution, not litigation.

Lloyd McGee: Washington's National Forests - East of the Cascades...A Pathway Forward

Jim Petersen -

McGee discusses collaborative success. "As a direct result of all their hard work we have a pathway forward. We also have the science, tools, technologies and skill sets needed to move forward with the restoration work necessary to protect forests that are the cornerstones and building blocks of both our rural and urban lifestyles."

Ryan Haugo: Washington's National Forests - East of the Cascades...Good Fire, Bad Fire

Jim Petersen -

In forests that have traditionally supported timber economies, we can use ecological restoration strategies that rely on mechanical thinning and prescribed fire. Elsewhere, we advocate for managing wildfires at the right place and time – when conditions are right. Just as there is no simple answer to the good-fire bad-fire question, there is also no single approach to conserving the forested landscapes we all treasure.”

Susan Jones: Washington's Forests - East of the Cascades...The Evolution Of CLT

Jim Petersen -

CLT is an engineered wood product. By that, I mean that it is a product assembled from pieces of lumber, usually two-by-sixes, eight feet wide, 40' feet long, layered at right angles to one another, like the layering of thinly sliced veneer used to make sheets of plywood. Picture a laminated wood beam, with the layers all running one direction. Now remind yourself that, in CLT, the layers run at right angles to one another, like plywood. The product is incredibly strong for its weight, which is about one-third that of steel. Some refer to CLT “plywood on steroids.” It’s a very apt description.